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Alleged Waukesha Killer Trial Begins - Nobody Was Ready for Disturbing Display He Prepared for Them

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This thug is unbelievable.

The career criminal charged with killing six people in a brutal vehicular attack on a Waukesha, Wisconsin, Christmas parade in November 2021 appeared in court for the first day of his homicide trial on Monday.

Darrell Brooks complicated jury selection proceedings through a variety of courtroom antics.

At one point, Brooks even exchanged heated words with Waukesha County Judge Jennifer Dorow, according to the New York Post. Brooks claimed he didn’t recognize Judge Dorow as a legitimate judge of the state.

The defendant — representing himself as his own lawyer — spoke over Judge Dorow with arguments that resembled claims associated with the fringe “Sovereign Citizen” movement.

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“I do not consent to any… paperwork that is not based factually in law,” Brooks claimed.

Except that’s not really how the American justice system works. You can’t just nullify the homicide charges against yourself by refusing to “consent” to them.

Brooks had to be removed from the courtroom — more than once, according to the Post.

Should Darrell Brooks be convicted?

The judge arranged for Brooks to view court proceedings from a separate room via video link, and threatened to appoint an attorney for the disruptive defendant, according to the Post.

Judge Dorow was forced to call ten different courtroom recesses in response to a variety of disruptions and bizarre behavior on the part of Brooks.

Brooks repeatedly pulled a suit jacket over his head and rested on a table during the jury selection proceedings.

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One might think Brooks’ courtroom antics are a gambit in pursuit of being declared legally insane. But the defendant withdrew a plea claiming he was not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect last month.

Brooks refused to explain why he was changing his plea.

The defendant has an extensive social media history voicing his support for violent extremism, including advocating for violence against Jews and white people.

Brooks has been previously convicted of a litany of violent crimes and felonies. He was out of custody on a paltry $1,000 bail when he was arrested for the Christmas parade massacre.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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